growth-mindset

Growth Mindset

2 SEMINARS

“The human individual lives usually far within his limits; he possesses powers of various sorts which he habitually fails to use. He energizes below his maximum, and he behaves below his optimum.” – Psychologist William James

Growth Mindset needs no introduction. It has been pushed relentlessly in schools recently, and for good reason. It's the mindset of the most successful students. Based on research by Carol Dweck, Growth Mindset is the belief that qualities such as intellectual capacity are not just based on innate ability but can be cultivated through effort. On the other hand, a fixed mindset is the ‘either you have it or you don’t’ mentality. It is the belief that one’s ability is set in stone from birth and cannot be altered.

A student with a fixed mindset is more likely to shy away from asking questions in class for fear of looking ‘stupid’. If they were ‘smart’ they wouldn’t need to ask questions in the first place. On the other hand, a student with a growth mindset views asking questions in class, not as indicative of their lack of intellectual ability, but as opportunities to learn and grow. These students do not fear the failure to meet an intellectual challenge but view it as a stepping stone to success. As such, these students are more likely to embrace intellectual challenges, have higher life aspirations and get better grades.

Research has shown that learning about a growth mindset leads to a greater enjoyment of the academic process, greater academic engagement, and higher grades in students.1

In fact, learning about a growth mindset has a greater impact on student performance than learning study skills and cramming additional curriculum content before an exam.2

Our innovative seminars incorporate Dweck's breakthrough ideas as well as contemporary research by neurologist Dr Douglas Fields and psychologist Anders Ericcson to transform your students’ mindsets. Our unique seminars contain powerful growth mindset advice from some of the most successful individuals in history and compelling real life examples to leave your students feeling like they can achieve anything.

SEMINAR one

Growth Mindset – Key Principles (1.5 hours)

In this seminar your students will learn:

  • 1

    The difference between a growth mindset and a fixed mindset.

  • 2

    How a growth mindset can transform their view of their potential.

  • 3

    How the brain learns and grows, including activities they can use to grow their brain.

  • 4

    How obstacles and failures can be stepping stones to success.

  • 5

    The different types of intelligences.

  • 6

    Why effort is more important than IQ.

  • 7

    Inspirational growth mindset stories.

  • 8

    Putting theory into practice by identifying their limiting beliefs and considering how they will use a growth mindset to overcome them.

SEMINAR two

Growth Mindset in Practice – From Coping to Thriving (1.5 hours)

This is one of our most powerful seminars. We take the principles of growth mindset and apply them practically to help your students take responsibility for their education and their lives in general.

In this seminar your students will learn:

  • 1

    How to take charge of their life and learning goals.

  • 2

    The difference between an internal and external locus of control.

  • 3

    How to change from a victim mindset to a leadership mindset.

  • 4

    How to challenge self-rationalizations and verify internal beliefs.

  • 5

    The importance of developing self-accountability.

  • 6

    How to focus on solutions rather than problems.

  • 7

    How to develop independent thought.

  • 8

    The importance of lifelong learning and constant development.

  • 9

    How to adapt to change.

  • 10

    The mindset of an innovator.

These are two independent seminars that can be booked separately.

References:

1. Aronson, J., Fried, C. B., & Good, C. (2002). Reducing the effects of stereotype threat on African American college students by shaping theories of intelligence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 38(2), 113-125

2. Good, C., Aronson, J., & Inzlicht, M. (2003). Improving adolescents' standardized test performance: An intervention to reduce the effects of stereotype threat. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 24(6), 645-662. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2003.09.002

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